How Much To Feed A Scottish Deerhound Puppy? [Answered]

The original aim of the Scottish Deerhound was to hunt and bring down the majestic Scottish roe deer, which was twice or more the size of the dog.

But, how much to feed a scottish deerhound puppy?

If the Scottish Deerhound were to put up a personal ad today, they would say they desire long walks, running opportunities, regular meals, and a nice sofa to lay on.

Although these dogs are devoted to the humans in their lives, they do not adapt well to living in apartments or with inexperienced pet owners.

They’re enormous and energetic, so they need a lot of space to gallop about in.

Part 2 - How Much Exercise Does You...
Part 2 - How Much Exercise Does Your Dog Need,?

These dogs require a professional trainer who can be firm but fair with them.

They also despise being left home alone for extended periods of time.

If you have the power and endurance to meet this breed’s needs, you’ll have a loyal, loving companion for life.

How Much To Feed A Scottish Deerhound Puppy?
How Much To Feed A Scottish Deerhound Puppy?

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How Much Should A Scottish Deerhound Puppy Eat?

While some people prefer to feed their Scottish Deerhounds a raw or homemade diet, your puppy or dog should be able to eat excellent commercial dog food.

The breed can eat a wide variety of high-quality dog meals.

They do, however, demand high-quality nutrients.

This is not a breed that can survive on low-cost dog food.

The Scottish Deerhound should be fed meals with low to moderate protein percentages and low to moderate fat percentages, according to most sources.

This holds true for both adult and puppy dogs.

Many large breed dog foods may fit these needs, but read labels carefully and compare percentages.

Chicken, fish, and eggs are common sources of animal protein for Scottish Deerhounds. Grains like pearled barley, oatmeal, and brown rice are suitable for them.

Omega fatty acids (3 and 6), glucosamine and chondroitin, prebiotics, probiotics, antioxidants, vitamins and minerals should all be included in a Scottish Deerhound’s diet.

Carrots, sweet potatoes, and other common vegetables, as well as fruits and berries like apples, cranberries, and blueberries, round out the nutritious ingredients.

As a breed, Scottish Deerhounds are prone to bloat (described below), as well as the joint issues that come with being a big breed.

This type of diet, which consists of many little meals throughout the day, is thought to help people avoid issues.

For adult dogs, we recommend measuring the amount of food you feed and only leaving it out for around half an hour.

After that, put it away. This should provide enough time for your dog to eat.

Adult Scottish Deerhounds should be fed many little meals every day throughout their lifetimes.

However, because Scottish Deerhound puppies can be fussy eaters, the Scottish Deerhound Club of America recommends having a dish of kibble ready for them to nibble on during the day, as well as feeding them 3-4 small meals each day while they are growing.

Bloating is more common in large, deep-chested breeds like the Scottish Deerhound.

Feeding one large meal (or even two large meals) per day will encourage dogs to eat quickly, gulping in air, which can cause bloat.

Many other theories on what causes bloating are still debated, but everyone seems to agree that eating several small meals throughout the day is healthy.

Slim puppies, like all puppies, are preferable than roly-poly puppies.

Fat puppies are more likely to develop bone and joint issues later in life.

Maintain the leanness of your Scottish Deerhound throughout his life.

This is usually not a difficult task, especially with puppies.

These puppies are high-energy and, as previously stated, can be picky eaters.

The Scottish Deerhound, like other sighthound breeds, might appear frail to those unfamiliar with the breed (though this is mitigated somewhat in the case of the deerhound because of the harsh coat which can hide his outline).

Ignore any comments from those who are unfamiliar with the breed.

Sighthounds are known for being slender. In the United States today, more than half of all dogs are overweight or obese.

The majority of dog owners are poor judges of what a healthy dog should look like.

Scottish Deerhound Puppy Feeding Chart

Weight at MaturityWeight at Maturity1-1/2 – 3 Months4 – 5 Months6 – 8 Months9 – 11 Months1 – 2 Years
(lbs)(kg)(cups)(cups)(cups)(cups)(cups)
3 – 121.4 – 5.41/2 – 12/3 – 1-1/31/2 – 1-1/2Feed as AdultFeed as Adult
13 – 205.9 – 9.11/2 – 1-1/41-1/8 – 23/4 – 1-1/31 – 1-1/2Feed as Adult
21 – 509.5 – 22.71/2 – 1-1/21-1/2 – 2-3/41-1/8 – 2-1/32 – 32 – 4-1/4
51 – 7523.1 – 34.05/8 – 2-1/31-1/2 – 41-1/2 – 3-3/42-1/2 – 4-3/42-5/8 – 6-1/4
76 – 10034.5 – 45.41 – 2-2/32-7/8 – 3-3/42-7/8 – 6-1/33-7/8 -75-5/8 – 11
101 lbs and overOver 45.4 kg2-2/3 cups plus 1/3 cup for each 10 lbs of body weight over 100 lbs3-3/4 cups plus 1/3 cup for each 10 lbs of body weight over 100 lbs6-1/3 cups plus 1/3 cup for each 10 lbs of body weight over 100 lbs7 cups plus 1/3 cup for each 10 lbs of body weight over 100 lbs11 cups plus 1/3 cup for each 10 lbs of body weight over 100 lbs
Scottish Deerhound Puppy Feeding Chart

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  Here Are The Feeding Suggestions For A Scottish Deerhound Puppy

  • Between the ages of eight and twelve weeks, Scottish Deerhound puppies require four meals every 24 hours.
  • Feed three meals in a twenty-four-hour period to scottish deerhound puppies aged three to six months.
  • Puppies from 6 months to a year should be fed two meals per day.
  • One meal per day is all that is required by the time the scottish deerhound reaches his first birthday.
  • Adult scottish deerhounds frequently consume two smaller portions. It is your responsibility to become familiar with your scottish deerhound’s dietary habits.

For adult scottish deerhounds, high-quality dry dogfood can be blended with canned food, broth, or water to offer balanced nutrition.

Cottage cheese, fruits and vegetables, and cooked eggs may also be enjoyed by your Scottish deerhound, but these additions should not account for more than ten percent of his or her daily food ration.

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Puppies of Scottish Deerhounds should be fed high-quality, brand-name puppy chow.

Please try to limit “table food” because it can lead to vitamin and mineral shortages, bone and tooth problems, picky eating habits, as well as obesity.

Always provide clean, freshwater, and make sure to clean the food and water bowls on a daily basis.

How To Take Care Of Your Scottish Deerhound?

The Scottish Deerhound breed enjoys spending time with its human family inside the house.

Despite this, the dog can adapt to life outside in either a hot or cold climate.

The breed requires regular exercise, ideally in the form of a long walk or jogging in a confined space.

Hair should be cut every now and then to keep it from tangling, and brushing will assist eliminate any dead hair.

The fur around the dog’s face and ears should also be removed.

How Much To Feed A Scottish Deerhound Puppy?

While some people prefer to feed their Scottish Deerhounds a raw or homemade diet, your puppy or dog should be able to eat a portion of excellent commercial dog food.

The breed can eat a wide variety of high-quality dog meals.

They do, however, demand high-quality nutrients.

This is not a breed that can survive on low-cost dog food.

The Scottish Deerhound should be fed meals with low to moderate protein percentages and low to moderate fat percentages, according to most sources.

This holds true for both adult and puppy dogs.

Many large breed dog foods may fit these needs, but read labels carefully and compare percentages.

Chicken, fish, and eggs are common sources of animal protein for Scottish Deerhounds.

Grains like pearled barley, oatmeal, and brown rice are suitable for them.

Omega fatty acids (3 and 6), glucosamine and chondroitin, prebiotics, probiotics, antioxidants, vitamins and minerals should all be included in a Scottish Deerhound’s diet.

Carrots, sweet potatoes, and other common vegetables, as well as fruits and berries like apples, cranberries, and blueberries, round out the nutritious ingredients.

As a breed, Scottish Deerhounds are prone to bloat (described below), as well as the joint issues that come with being a big breed.

This type of diet, which consists of many little meals throughout the day, is thought to help people avoid issues.

For adult dogs, we recommend measuring the amount of food you feed and only leaving it out for around half an hour.

After that, put it away.

This should provide enough time for your dog to eat. Adult Scottish Deerhounds should be fed many little meals every day throughout their lifetimes.

However, because Scottish Deerhound puppies can be fussy eaters, the Scottish Deerhound Club of America recommends having a dish of kibble ready for them to nibble on during the day, as well as feeding them 3-4 small meals each day while they are growing.

Bloating is more common in large, deep-chested breeds like the Scottish Deerhound.

Feeding one large meal (or even two large meals) per day will encourage dogs to eat quickly, gulping in air, which can cause bloat.

Many other theories on what causes bloating are still debated, but everyone seems to agree that eating several small meals throughout the day is healthy.

Slim puppies, like all puppies, are preferable than roly-poly puppies.

Fat puppies are more likely to develop bone and joint issues later in life.

Maintain the leanness of your Scottish Deerhound throughout his life.

This is usually not a difficult task, especially with puppies.

These puppies are high-energy and, as previously stated, can be picky eaters.

The Scottish Deerhound, like other sighthound breeds, might appear frail to those unfamiliar with the breed (though this is mitigated somewhat in the case of the deerhound because of the harsh coat which can hide his outline).

Ignore any comments from those who are unfamiliar with the breed.

Sighthounds are known for being slender. In the United States today, more than half of all dogs are overweight or obese.

The majority of dog owners are poor judges of what a healthy dog should look like.

Dietary Guidelines and Nutrients for Scottish Deerhound

Dietary Guidelines and Nutrients for Scottish Deerhound
Dietary Guidelines and Nutrients for Scottish Deerhound

Male Scottish Deerhounds should be 30-32 inches in height and weigh 85-110 pounds, according to the breed standard. Females must be at least 28 inches tall.

They range in weight from 75 to 95 pounds. (Please keep in mind that some dogs will weigh more than others.)

A description of heights, weights, ages, and proportions can be found here.)

They’re one of the tallest sighthounds on the planet.

Male Scottish Deerhounds have been growing in size in the United States, according to the Scottish Deerhound Club of America, but female Scottish Deerhounds appear to be keeping within the breed standard.

The tough coat of the breed protects them from the hard terrain in which they were used to hunt in the Scottish Highlands.

They have a body type that is similar to that of a Greyhound, although they are larger and more heavily boned.

On a straight, clean terrain, they are not as swift as a Greyhound, but on rough, heavy ground, the Scottish Deerhound excels.

Scottish Deerhound puppies, like most puppies, are very energetic and can become destructive if they do not have an appropriate outlet for their energy.

Puppies of Scottish Deerhounds require a lot of space to run around and play while they are growing.

These puppies’ bones and muscles will not properly grow if they only go for walks or play for brief periods of time.

They require long romps and runs, particularly in the company of another deerhound or sighthound.

Because deerhounds’ play can be rough, little dogs may inadvertently damage themselves if they try to keep up with them.

Keep in mind that the Scottish Deerhound is a large breed that takes a long time to mature.

Puppyhood can last a long time.

The lure coursing ability of Scottish Deerhounds is exceptional (something you may wish to consider pursuing with your deerhound).

Although they are not always as skilled as their owners in agility or rally, several people and their dogs nevertheless love these games.

If your dog participates in one of these activities, you should account for it when calculating how many calories he requires in his food.

They demand a diet rich in high-quality protein.

An active adult Scottish Deerhound dog weighing 95 pounds requires an average daily caloric intake of 2122 calories, according to the National Research Council of the National Academies.

Spayed or neutered dogs, as well as those who are older, may require fewer calories.

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You may need to feed 3537 kcal or more on weekends if you are coursing with your Scottish Deerhound (95 pounds) in moderate activity.

A 60-pound Scottish Deerhound puppy may easily consume 1671 calories per day.

Protein is essential in your dog’s diet.

Fat is a key source of energy for dogs, and it should account for at least 8% of the Scottish Deerhound puppy’s diet and 5% of the adult’s diet.

Scottish Deerhounds, like many other sighthounds and huge breeds, go through rapid growth spurts in their first few years.

Feeding children high-concentration, high-energy foods can be dangerous because they can cause bone and joint disorders, as well as traumas.

Scottish Deerhounds, like other sighthounds, are built for speed and have very little body fat.

Scottish Deerhound puppies should be fed large breed puppy food*.

The growth plates for some bones in large breeds, such as the Scottish Deerhound, can continue to grow for nearly two years.

Slow-growth diet is significantly better for these bones and can help prevent joint problems.

To support gradual growth, these puppy feeds pay special attention to the calcium to phosphorus ratio in the food and maintain protein and calories somewhat lower.

Unfortunately, some grain-free or extremely high-protein dog meals are not recommended for puppies due to an improper calcium-to-phosphorus ratio.

Once your puppy has achieved around 90% of adult size, you can begin feeding him adult dog food.

Scottish Deerhound Puppies’ Best Dog Food

Every dog is a one-of-a-kind creation.

Some dogs require more energy than others.

Some dogs respond better to higher levels of protein or fat than others.

We have several suggested foods for your Scottish Deerhound that satisfy our standards, but you may have to experiment to determine which diet works best for your dog.

Allow several days to gradually transition to the new diet, mixing in a little of your dog’s old food each day.

Of course, if your dog exhibits signals that he doesn’t enjoy or tolerate the meal, you’ll need to make changes.

If your dog takes the food but you don’t like his condition after a few weeks, gradually transition him back to his old chow.

It’s important not to jump right into trying something new.

If you switch to too many new foods in a short period of time, you risk upsetting your dog’s digestive tract.

You can try a new food once your dog has settled back into his old routine with his old food.

Allow at least two weeks between foods before introducing a new one to give your dog’s digestive system a chance to relax and heal.

This also offers the new meal an opportunity to prove itself.

If your dog doesn’t appear enthused about new food, you could try another dish from the same product line that includes a different type of beef protein or other components.

The food should be similar to the original item you selected as long as the guaranteed analysis and nutritional percentages are similar.

It’s critical to examine your dog’s physical condition when you’re introducing a new meal and he’s eating it without issue.

Is the new food causing him to gain or lose weight? Is his coat in good condition?

Are his pupils dilated?

Is he energetic, or does he appear to be more sluggish than usual?

And, of course, any dog lover’s biggest concern: what does his poop look like?

Checking a dog’s excrement can reveal a lot about his health, as most dog owners are aware.

Does it appear to be healthy and firm? If he has bowel movements on a regular basis.

Those are all positive indicators.

It’s possible that the new diet is causing your dog’s runny stool or diarrhea, or causing him to have gastrointestinal problems.

These are all things to keep in mind when feeding a new diet for the first few weeks.

Even though your dog adores the food, if he isn’t thriving, you may need to reconsider his diet or the amount you feed him.

We tried to choose foods for Scottish Deerhounds that were low to moderate in protein and low to moderate in fat.

Unless otherwise stated, all of the foods listed are free of corn, wheat, and soy.

Dr. Gary’s Holistic Large Breed 

Dr. Gary’s Best Breed is a small, self-contained business.

Foods are prepared in tiny batches utilizing a unique, low-temperature slow-cooking procedure that is supposed to make carbohydrates easier to digest and promote optimal nutritional absorption.

Only EU-approved ingredients are used in the formulae, which must sometimes reach a higher level than USDA-approved ingredients.

There are no animal by-products, cheap fillers, gluten, or artificial preservatives, flavors, or colors in the foods.

There will be no corn or wheat.

Best Breed only uses fish and fowl raised without antibiotics that are free of ethoxyquin. (All poultry in the United States is reared without the use of additional hormones.)

The large breed diet is designed to help large breed dogs stay healthy.

It’s especially beneficial for dogs with sensitive stomachs. Chicken Meal, Oatmeal, Brown Rice, Dried Beet Pulp, and Chicken Fat [Preserved with Natural Mixed Tocopherols (Vitamin E)] are the first five ingredients in the large breed recipe.

With 456 calories per cup, it contains 25% crude protein and 13% crude fat. This is a food for dogs of all life stages.

Now Fresh Grain Free Large Breed Adult Recipe

Petcurean now produces Fresh Grain Free Large Breed Adult Recipe.

You may be more familiar with some of this Canadian company’s other product lines, such as Go!, Spike, or Summit.

This large dog food is produced with 100% fresh turkey, salmon, and duck, as well as 100% fresh omega 3 and 6 oils from coconuts and canola.

It doesn’t contain any maize, wheat, or soy, as well as any other cereals, gluten, or meat.

There are no rendered meats, by-products, or artificial preservatives in this dish.

This formula contains New Zealand green mussels, as well as glucosamine and chondroitin, which should help Scottish Deerhounds’ joints.

L-Carnitine has been added for a healthy heart and to aid in the conversion of fat into lean muscle.

It contains taurine, which is necessary for healthy vision and heart function.

It also contains pre- and probiotics to aid digestion.

Deboned turkey is the first ingredient.

It has 363 calories per cup and contains 27% crude protein and 13% crude fat.

These levels should assist your Scottish Deerhound in maintaining a healthy weight.

In terms of bone and joint health, heart health, and quality components, we believe this meal has some good attributes for a large breed.

Wellness Large Breed Complete Health Adult Deboned Chicken & Brown Rice Recipe 

Although grains such as brown rice, oats, and barley are included in this recipe, they have nutritional advantages. They aren’t made up of empty carbs or fillers.

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Oatmeal and barley, for example, are high in dietary fiber. Deboned Chicken, Whitefish, Chicken Meal, Ground Brown Rice, and Oatmeal are the first five ingredients in this dish.

The food has a crude protein content of 25%, crude fat content of 11%, crude fiber content of 5%, and moisture content of 11%.

It also includes glucosamine and chondroitin, which many people believe are beneficial to large breed dogs with joint problems.

The food contains 363 calories per cup.

Fromm Large Breed Adult Gold

Fromm Large Breed Adult Gold is one of our favorite large dog feeds, designed exclusively for dogs over 50 pounds.

The first three ingredients are duck, chicken meal, and chicken.

Chicken cartilage is added to provide a natural form of glucosamine, which is important for large dogs’ joints.

Wheat, corn, or soy, which might irritate the digestive system, are not present in the diet.

Large breed dogs, such as Scottish Deerhounds, may benefit from Fromm Large Breed Adult Gold, which has a moderate protein and fat content.

The food has a moderate calorie content (378 kcal/cup), which helps your giant dog maintain his weight.

We also enjoy that Fromm is a Wisconsin-based family business that makes its food in small batches fresh every morning.

These are high-quality ingredients from a reputable manufacturer in a composition that should be suitable for your large dog.

Switching From Puppy To Adult Scottish Deerhound Food

Changing your dog’s food too quickly might result in gastrointestinal problems like vomiting, diarrhea, and a loss of appetite.

These adjustments should ideally take 5-7 days.

During this transition, gradually incorporate more and more of the new food into your dog’s current diet.

  • Day 1: 25% of the diet is new, while 75% of the diet is old.
  • Day 3: 50 percent for new diet and 50 percent to old diet
  • Day 5: 75 percent of the diet is new, while 25% is old.
  • Day 7: Completely different diet.

Some dogs, especially those with sensitive stomachs, food allergies, or other gastrointestinal problems, may require an even longer transition period.

If your dog displays any warning symptoms during the transition to a new food, such as changes in appetite, vomiting, or diarrhea, you need to be more cautious.

If your dog’s digestive issues do not improve after you have made the switch slowly, you should make an appointment with your pet’s veterinarian.

Altering one’s diet could be required in unusual circumstances, depending on the situation.

How Much Water Should A Scottish Deerhound Puppy Drink? 

How Much Water Should A Scottish Deerhound Puppy Drink? 
How Much Water Should A Scottish Deerhound Puppy Drink? 

On average, adult dogs need one ounce of water per pound of body weight every day.

Despite their diminutive appearance, growing puppies consume more than their adult counterparts.

Your puppy’s age, size, and degree of activity, on the other hand, all play a part.

Watch your dog to make sure he has adequate water… but not too much.

How Much Daily Exercise Does A Scottish Deerhound Puppy Require?

Scottish Deerhounds require exercise to be fit, engage their wits, and maintain their health.

Scottish deerhounds benefit greatly from exercise since it helps them avoid boredom, which can lead to undesirable behavior.

Many of your scottish deerhound’s instinctive needs to retrieve, dig, chew, pursue, and herd will be satisfied with a little fun and games.

The amount of activity required depends on your Scottish deerhound’s health and age, but ten minutes in the garden and a daily walk down the street are unlikely to suffice.

If your Scottish deerhound is a 6 to 18-month-old adolescent, her needs will most likely be higher.

Scottish Deerhound Background Information

Scottish Deerhound | Mark Robinson | Flickr
Scottish Deerhound

With its athletic, well-muscled form, it’s easy to see how this breed earned the title of “Royal Dog of Scotland.”

The Scottish Deerhound has a fascinating past, a noble bearing, and a loving nature, to the point where Sir Walter Scott, who owned a deerhound named Maida, called it “the most perfect creature of Heaven.”

What is it about this huge dog, with his wiry coat and greyhound-like physique, that appeals to you?

Many of the questions can’t be answered in words and must be experienced directly.

Everyone, including family, friends, and strangers, is loved by the Scottish Deerhound.

He enjoys being around youngsters and does well with other dogs, albeit the larger the dog, the better.

He enjoys a nice jog with a human friend, but later he is content to lounge on the sofa and rest in a sunny spot.

This sweet dog has an aura of elegance and politeness about him, but he is never aloof.

While he is unquestionably brave and loyal, he isn’t the finest watchdog.

His size may appear daunting to those who are unfamiliar with him, but he is far too loving and kind to be a threat, and he rarely barks when someone approaches his home.

As a puppy, he’s very active, but by the time he’s 3 to 5 years old, he’s become a couch potato.

Despite this, he still takes daily long walks to maintain his tall, gangly frame.

The Scottish Deerhound is patient with inexperienced dog owners, but even they should be aware that he is not the easiest breed to train.

Deerhounds are lethargic and have a “What’s in it for me?” mentality when it comes to training.

They have a reputation for not doing well in obedience and agility competitions, but if their trainers are prepared to put in the time and effort, they can thrive in these areas.

Although Scottish Deerhounds are slower than other breeds when it comes to housetraining, the same patience and perseverance that you used to train your dog can help you with this step.

Despite their quiet interior disposition, Scottish Deerhounds are not advised for apartment living.

They thrive in a large yard with plenty of room to run around in, and the yard should be fenced to keep them from chasing “prey” into the street.

With this breed, underground electronic fence should not be used; once they get into chase mode, no amount of shock will stop them.

They do best in homes without cats or other small pets, as they can activate their prey drive.

The Scottish Deerhound is a loving companion who will fill your life with all the love his enormous and dignified heart can give if you can meet the particular needs of a giant breed developed for speed.

Frequently Asked Question Scottish Deerhound

What do you feed a deerhound puppy?

Many large breed dog foods may fit these needs, but read labels carefully and compare percentages. Chicken, fish, and eggs are common sources of animal protein for Scottish Deerhounds. Grains like pearled barley, oatmeal, and brown rice are suitable for them.

How much food should puppies eat per day?

Puppies should be fed three to four times per day, so if you’re now feeding 34 cup of puppy chow twice a day, spread it out by feeding 12 cup three times a day.

How much should a 10kg dog eat a day?

A 10kg dog, for example, would require 200-300 grams of food per day. Every day, 100-150 grams of Nature Dog and 100-150 grams of raw meaty bones would be ideal. You can, however, change the ratios to suit your own preferences.

How much food does a deerhound eat?

3 to 4 cups of high-quality dry food per day, divided into two meals, is the recommended daily quantity. The amount of food your adult dog consumes is determined by his size, age, build, metabolism, and degree of activity. Dogs, like people, are unique individuals who require different amounts of food.

How much should a puppy of 10 weeks eat?

Check to see if you’re feeding the proper amount of food. Feeding your puppy 20g per 1kg of body weight per day is a simple rule of thumb.

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